[II] CONTENTS.

CONTENTS.

PAGE

151.

RĀJOVĀDA-JĀTAKA

1

Two kings, both wise and good, meet in a narrow way, and a dispute arises who is to give place. Both are of the same age and power. Their drivers sing each his master’s praises. One is good to the good, and bad to the bad; the other repays evil with good. The first acknowledges his superior, and gives place.

152.

SIGĀLA-JĀTAKA

4

The Bodhisatta is a young lion, one of seven brothers; a Jackal proposes love to his sister. Six of the brothers set out to kill the jackal, but seeing him as he lies in a crystal grotto, imagine him to be in the sky, leap up and kill themselves. The Bodhisatta roars, and the jackal dies of fear.

153.

SŪKARA-JĀTAKA

7

A boar challenges a lion to fight; and then in fear wallows amid filth until he smells so foul that the lion will not come near him, but owns himself vanquished rather than fight with him.

154.

URAGA-JĀTAKA

9

A Garuḷa chases a serpent, which taking the form of a jewel, fixes himself upon an ascetic’s garment, and by this means wins safety.

155.

GAGGA-JĀTAKA

11

How a goblin had power over all people who did not wish each other well at a sneeze, and how he was foiled.

156.

ALĪNA-CITTA-JĀTAKA

13

An elephant runs a thorn into its foot; it is tended by some carpenters, and serves them out of gratitude. His young one takes his place afterwards, and is bought by the king for a large sum. How on the king’s death, it routs a hostile host, and saves the kingdom for the king’s infant son.

p. x

PAGE

157.

GUṆA-JĀTAKA

17

A jackal rescues a lion, who out of gratitude makes him a friend. The lioness is jealous of the she-jackal; then the whole matter is explained, and maxims given in praise of friendship.

158.

SUHANU-JĀTAKA

21

Two savage horses, that maltreat all other of their kind, strike up a sudden friendship with each other, thus illustrating the proverb, ‘Birds of a feather.’

159.

MORA-JĀTAKA

23

How a peacock kept itself safe by reciting spells; how its mind was disturbed by hearing the female’s note, and it was caught; how the king desired to eat it, but the peacock discoursed such good divinity that he was stayed; and finally the bird was set free again to return to the mountains.

160.

VINĪLAKA-JĀTAKA

26

A bird, the offspring of a goose with a crow, is being carried by his father’s two other sons to see him, but is arrogant and compares them to horses that serve him; so he is sent back again.

161.

INDASAMĀNAGOTTA-JĀTAKA

28

How a man kept a fat elephant, which turned against him and trampled him to death.

162.

SANTHAVA-JĀTAKA

29

How a man had his house burnt by reason of the great offerings which he made to his sacred fire.

163.

SUSĪMA-JĀTAKA

31

How a lad whose hereditary right it was to manage a festival, journeyed 2000 leagues in a day, learnt the ceremonial, and returned in time to conduct the ceremony.

164.

GIJJHA-JĀTAKA

34

About a merchant who succoured some vultures, and they in return stole cloths and other things and brought to him; how one was caught, and the king learnt the story, and all the goods were restored.

165.

NAKULA-JĀTAKA

36

How a mongoose and a snake were friends, and distrusted each other nevertheless; and how they were made at one.

166.

UPASĀḶHA-JĀTAKA

37

How a certain man was particular in choice of burying-grounds, and how he was shown that there is no spot free of taint from some dead body.

p. xi

PAGE

167.

SAMIDDHI-JĀTAKA

39

How a nymph tempted the saint to love, and he resisted, since no man knows the time of death.

168.

SAKUṆAGGHI-JĀTAKA

40

How a quail beat a falcon by fighting on his own ground.

169.

ARAKA-JĀTAKA

42

How the Buddha forsook the world, and discoursed on charity.

170.

KAKAṆṬAKA-JĀTAKA

43

(See Mahā-ummagga.)

171.

KALYĀṆA-DHAMMA-JĀTAKA

44

How a certain man became a recluse all because of a lucky greeting.

172.

DADDARA-JĀTAKA

45

How a jackal amongst lions betrayed himself by his tongue.

173.

MAKKAṬA-JĀTAKA

47

How a monkey disguised himself as an ascetic, and was found out.

174.

DŪBHIYA-MAKKAṬA-JĀTAKA

48

How the Bodhisatta drew water for a monkey, and all he got for his pains was a grimace and an insult.

175.

ĀDICCUPAṬṬHĀNA-JĀTAKA

50

How a rascally monkey made havoc in the settlement, and the people took him for a holy being.

176.

KALĀYA-MUṬṬHI-JĀTAKA

51

How a monkey threw away a handful of peas to find one.

177.

TIṆḌUKA-JĀTAKA

53

How a troop of monkeys entered a village by night, and were surrounded by the villagers; and the device by which they were saved.

178.

KACCHAPA-JĀTAKA

55

How a tortoise came to grief because he loved his home too much.

179.

SATADHAMMA-JĀTAKA

57

How a proud young brahmin ate the leavings of a low-caste man, and then felt ashamed of himself.

180.

DUDDADA-JĀTAKA

59

Where faith is, no gift is small.

p. xii

PAGE

181.

ASADISA-JĀTAKA

60

Of a clever archer, and his feats.

182.

SAṀGĀMĀVACARA-JĀTAKA

63

How a noble elephant obeyed the word of command.

183.

VĀLODAKA-JĀTAKA

65

He that is noble keeps a steady brain even though he drain most potent liquor dry.

184.

GIRIDANTA-JĀTAKA

67

Evil communications corrupt good manners.

185.

ANABHIRATI-JĀTAKA

68

On serenity of mind.

186.

DADHI-VĀHANA-JĀTAKA

69

The Magic Razor-axe, Milk-bowl, and Drum.

187.

CATUMAṬṬA-JĀTAKA

73

How a jackal was reproved for intruding.

188.

SĪHAKOṬṬHUKA-JĀTAKA

75

How a mongrel cub among lions was betrayed by its voice.

189.

SĪHACAMMA-JĀTAKA

76

The ass in the lion’s skin.

190.

SĪLĀNISAṀSA-JĀTAKA

77

How a virtuous barber saved another man by his merit.

191.

RUHAKA-JĀTAKA

79

How a wicked wife fooled her husband, and sent him prancing down the street in horse-trappings.

192.

SIRI-KĀḶAKAṆṆI-JĀTAKA

80

(See Mahā-ummagga.)

193.

CULLA-PADUMA-JĀTAKA

81

Of a wicked wife, who tried to murder her husband, and finally with her paramour was brought for trial before her husband, then become king.

194.

MAṆICORA-JĀTAKA

85

Of the plot devised by a king to take the wife of another man; and how Sakka caused him to change bodies with his victim, and so to be executed himself.

195.

PABBATŪPATTHARA-JĀTAKA

88

How the Bodhisatta advised a king to condone an intrigue.

196.

VALĀHASSA-JĀTAKA

89

How some shipwrecked mariners escaped from a city of goblins by aid of a flying horse.

p. xiii

PAGE

197.

MITTĀMITTA-JĀTAKA

91

How to tell friend from foe.

198.

RĀDHA-JĀTAKA

92

How a parrot told tales of his mistress, and had his neck wrung.

199.

GAHAPATI-JĀTAKA

94

How a wife tried to trick her husband, and was found out.

200.

SĀDHUSĪLA-JĀTAKA

96

How a father chose a husband for his daughters.

201.

BANDHANĀGĀRA-JĀTAKA

97

The real fetters are those of desire.

202.

KEḶI-SĪLA-JĀTAKA

98

How Sakka rebuked an irreverent king.

203.

KHANDHA-VATTA-JĀTAKA

100

How to win the goodwill of snakes.

204.

VĪRAKA-JĀTAKA

103

How a crow tried to steal meat, and was plucked.

205.

GAṄGEYYA-JĀTAKA

104

How two fish disputed which should be the more beautiful, and a tortoise answered that he was more beautiful than either.

206.

KURUṄGA-MIGA-JĀTAKA

106

How a woodpecker and a tortoise rescued their friend the antelope from a trap.

207.

ASSAKA-JĀTAKA

108

How a king was cured of love for his dead wife by a revelation of her present condition.

208.

SUṀSUMĀRA-JĀTAKA

110

How a crocodile wanted the heart of a monkey, and how the monkey pretended that it was hanging on a fig-tree.

209.

KAKKARA-JĀTAKA

112

How a fowler tried to stalk a bird by covering himself with branches.

210.

KANDAGALAKA-JĀTAKA

113

How a woodpecker struck a tree too hard for it, and perished.

211.

SOMADATTA-JĀTAKA

115

How a foolish man gave when he meant to crave.

p. xiv

PAGE

212.

UCCHIṬṬHA-BHATTA-JĀTAKA

117

How a husband found out his wife’s intrigue by the state of the rice.

213.

BHARU-JĀTAKA

118

How the king of Bharu made two bands of hermits to quarrel.

214.

PUṆṆA-NADĪ-JĀTAKA

121

How a king sent a riddling message to his former preceptor.

215.

KACCHAPA-JĀTAKA

123

How a tortoise was conveyed through the air, biting with his teeth upon a stick; and how he answered to a taunt, and fell.

216.

MACCHA-JĀTAKA

125

How a fish being captured lamented for loss of his wife, and was set at liberty.

217.

SEGGU-JĀTAKA

126

How a pious greengrocer tested his daughter’s virtue.

218.

KŪṬA-VĀṆIJA-JĀTAKA

127

How a man deposited ploughshares with a friend, and the friend protested that they had been eaten by rats; and of the clever device by which the man’s guilt was brought home to him.

219.

GARAHITA-JĀTAKA

129

How a monkey had been a captive of men, and escaped, and his censure upon mankind.

220.

DHAMMADDHAJA-JĀTAKA

131

How impossible tasks were set to a good man, who did them all by aid of Sakka.

221.

KĀSĀVA-JĀTAKA

138

How a man disguised himself in holy robes, and killed elephants; and how he was put to shame.

222.

CŪLA-NANDIYA-JĀTAKA

140

How two monkeys sacrificed their lives to save their mother, and what befel the hunter.

223.

PUṬA-BHATTA-JĀTAKA

142

How a harsh husband was rebuked.

224.

KUMBHĪLA-JĀTAKA

145

225.

KHANTI-VAṆṆANA-JĀTAKA

145

How two sinners were made to amend their ways.

p. xv

PAGE

226.

KOSIYA-JĀTAKA

146

How an owl came to grief through sallying forth untimely.

227.

GŪTHA-PĀṆA-JĀTAKA

147

How an intoxicated beetle challenged an elephant, and was ignominiously destroyed.

228.

KĀMANĪTA-JĀTAKA

149

How a king was cured of greed.

229.

PALĀYI-JĀTAKA

151

How a king was frightened away by the mere sight of a city gate.

230.

DUTIYA-PALĀYI-JĀTAKA

153

How a hostile king was frightened away by the sight of the Bodhisatta, and the hearing of his threats.

231.

UPĀHANA-JĀTAKA

154

How a pupil tried to outdo his teacher, and was worsted.

232.

VĪṆĀ-THŪṆA-JĀTAKA

156

How a girl thought a humpback was a right royal man, and how she was undeceived.

233.

VIKAṆṆAKA-JĀTAKA

157

How some fish came to feed at the sound of a drum; and how a malevolent crocodile was speared.

234.

ASITĀBHŪ-JĀTAKA

158

How a man, enamoured of a sprite, lost his wife by this lust.

235.

VACCHA-NAKHA-JĀTAKA

160

How a Brother was tempted to return to the world, and the evil of a worldly life shown forth.

236.

BAKA-JĀTAKA

161

How a crane shammed sleep, in order to catch fish; and how he was exposed.

237.

SĀKETA-JĀTAKA

162

(As No. 68.)

238.

EKAPADA-JĀTAKA

163

Of a precocious boy who asked a philosophical question; and the answer to the same.

239.

HARITA-MĀTA-JĀTAKA

164

A water-snake that fell into a fish-trap, and how the fish all fell upon him; with a moral.

p. xvi

PAGE

240.

MAHĀ-PIṄGALA-JĀTAKA

165

How the porter mourned when his tyrannical master died, lest he should prove too much for the King of Death, and should be sent back to earth again.

241.

SABBA-DĀṬHA-JĀTAKA

168

How a jackal learnt the spell ‘Of subduing the world,’ and by it collected a great army of wild beasts; and how he was discomfited.

242.

SUNAKHA-JĀTAKA

170

How a dog gnawed through his leash, and escaped from servitude.

243.

GUTTILA-JĀTAKA

172

How a great musician played by aid of Sakka to the delight of all that heard.

244.

VĪTICCHA-JĀTAKA

178

How a certain man tried to catch the Master with phrases.

245.

MŪLA-PARIYĀYA-JĀTAKA

180

How the Master discomfited some would-be clever youths.

246.

TELOVĀDA-JĀTAKA

182

That there is no harm in eating meat, but only in taking life.

247.

PĀDAÑJALI-JĀTAKA

183

How a fool was found out.

248.

KIṀSUKOPAMA-JĀTAKA

184

How four lads saw a tree, and each described it differently.

249.

SĀLAKA-JĀTAKA

186

How soft words failed to bring down a monkey from a tree.

250.

KAPI-JĀTAKA

187

How a monkey disguised himself as an ascetic, and was found out.

251.

SAṀKAPPA-JĀTAKA

189

How an ascetic was tempted by lust, and how he was saved.

252.

TILA-MUṬṬHI-JĀTAKA

193

How a teacher chastised a pupil, and the pupil meditated revenge, but was appeased.

253.

MAṆI-KAṆṬHA-JĀTAKA

197

How a serpent and an ascetic were friends, and how the ascetic got rid of the serpent.

p. xvii

PAGE

254.

KUṆḌAKA-KUCCHI-SINDHAVA-JĀTAKA

199

Of a high-bred foal; how he knew his own worth, and what he could do for a marvel.

255.

SUKA-JĀTAKA

203

Of a parrot that used to bring food oversea for his parents, and how he ate too much, and was drowned.

256.

JARUDAPĀNA-JĀTAKA

205

How some men won a treasure by digging, and by digging too much lost it again.

257.

GĀMAṆI-CAṆḌA-JĀTAKA

207

How a prince’s wisdom was tried. Also how a man was haled to the king’s tribunal for injuries done unwittingly, and the judgements of the king thereupon; and of certain problems propounded to him by those he met. [Several stories in one.]

258.

MANDHĀTU-JĀTAKA

216

How a king could not win contentment, not though he ruled as King of Heaven.

259.

TIRĪṬA-VACCHA-JĀTAKA

218

How a king’s life was saved, and the gratitude which he showed to his deliverer.

260.

DŪTA-JĀTAKA

221

How a man got a meal by calling himself ‘Belly’s Messenger.’

261.

PADUMA-JĀTAKA

222

How some boys tried to wheedle a noseless gardener that he might give them a bunch of lotus.

262.

MUDU-PĀṆI-JĀTAKA

224

Love will find a way; and the nature of womankind.

263.

CULLA-PALOBHANA-JĀTAKA

227

How the Bodhisatta is tempted by a woman, and succumbs.

264.

MAHĀ-PANĀDA-JĀTAKA

229

(Incomplete: as No. 489.)

265.

KHURAPPA-JĀTAKA

231

How one brave man saved a caravan from robbers.

266.

VĀTAGGA-SINDHAVA-JĀTAKA

233

How a she-ass fell in love with a fine horse, and by coquetry lost him.

p. xviii

PAGE

267.

KAKKATA-JĀTAKA

235

How an elephant, by aid of his faithful mate, destroyed an immense crab.

268.

ĀRĀMA-DŪSA-JĀTAKA

237

How some monkeys were left to water a garden, and how they pulled up the trees to proportion the water to the length of the roots.

269.

SUJĀTA-JĀTAKA

239

How the shrew was tamed by observation of a cuckoo and a jay.

270.

ULŪKA-JĀTAKA

242

How the owl was proposed as king of the birds, but because of his sour looks, not taken.

271.

UDAPĀNA-DŪSAKA-JĀTAKA

243

The vile nature of jackals.

272.

VYAGGHA-JĀTAKA

244

How a sprite drove away from its wood a lion and tiger, and how men came and cut the trees down.

273.

KACCHAPA-JĀTAKA

246

How a monkey insulted a tortoise, and how he was punished.

274.

LOLA-JĀTAKA

248

How a crow lost his life through greed.

275.

RUCIRA-JĀTAKA

250

(As No. 274.)

276.

KURU-DHAMMA-JĀTAKA

251

How there was a drought, and by observance of virtue the rain was made to come.

277.

ROMAKA-JĀTAKA

260

How a sham ascetic tried to kill a bird, and failed.

278.

MAHISA-JĀTAKA

262

Of a wicked monkey, that was killed for his vileness; and of the patience of the Bodhisatta.

279.

SATAPATTA-JĀTAKA

264

How a man did not know his friend from his enemy; and how the Bodhisatta was a robber.

280.

PUṬA-DŪSAKA-JĀTAKA

266

Of a monkey who thought to please a gardener by destroying the potties which he made.

p. xix

PAGE

281.

ABBHANTARA-JĀTAKA

267

How a queen longed for a ‘middle mango’; and how a pet parrot procured one.

282.

SEYYA-JĀTAKA

273

How a marauding monarch was conquered by kindness.

283.

VAḌḌHAKI-SŪKARA-JĀTAKA

275

How a boar drilled an army of boars to conquer a tiger; and how a sham ascetic was done to death.

284.

SIRI-JĀTAKA

279

How luck came of eating the flesh of certain birds.

285.

MAṆI-SŪKARA-JĀTAKA

283

How some boars tried to sully crystal by rubbing it, and only made it shine the more.

286.

SĀLŪKA-JĀTAKA

285

How an ox envied the fatted pig.

287.

LĀBHA-GARAHA-JĀTAKA

287

Of the evil of a worldly life.

288.

MACCH-UDDĀNA-JĀTAKA

288

How a parcel of money was lost in the river, and restored by the river-spirit in the belly of a fish.

289.

NĀNA-CCHANDA-JĀTAKA

290

How a king fell into the hands of thieves, and a brahmin saw it; and what were the boons he asked.

290.

SĪLA-VĪMAṀSA-JĀTAKA

292

How a man tried his own reputation for virtue.

291.

BHADRA-GHAṬA-JĀTAKA

293

The Wishing-Bowl, with a moral ending.

292.

SUPATTA-JĀTAKA

297

How a queen of the crows desired some meat, and a brave crow got it for her.

293.

KĀYA-VICCHINDA-JĀTAKA

299

Of a sick man who on his recovery became religious, to his own great advantage.

294.

JAMBU-KHĀDAKA-JĀTAKA

299

The Fox and the Crow, with a difference.

p. xx

PAGE

295.

ANTA-JĀTAKA

300

Similar to the last, but vice versa.

296.

SAMUDDA-JĀTAKA

301

Of a crow that feared the sea might be drunk dry.

297.

KĀMA-VILĀPA-JĀTAKA

302

How desire is stronger than pain.

298.

UDUMBARA-JĀTAKA

303

Old birds cannot be caught with chaff.

299.

KOMĀYA-PUTTA-JĀTAKA

305

Upon the reformation of a mischievous monkey.

300.

VAKA-JĀTAKA

306

How a wolf kept a holy day service.

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