[III] CONTENTS.

CONTENTS.

30I. CULLAKĀLIṄGA-JĀTAKA 1

A king, being eager to fight, finds occasion to quarrel with another king. Misled by a prophecy of victory and neglecting the omens, he is defeated by his adversary.

302. MAHĀASSĀROHA-JĀTAKA 1

A king, being defeated by rebels, finds a hospitable shelter with a poor countryman, and rewards his benefactor with the half of his kingdom.

303. EKARAJA-JATAKA 9

A king is taken prisoner and tortured, and by his patience under suffering wins his enemy to repentance.

304. DADDARA-JĀTAKA 10

How two brothers were driven from their father’s kingdom, and how their pride was humbled by the contumely they suffered in their exile.

305. SĪLAVĪMAṀSANA-JĀTAKA 12

A teacher tests the virtue of his pupils by tempting them to steal. The only youth, that stands the test, is rewarded by marrying his master’s daughter.

306. SUJĀTA-JĀTAKA 13

How the daughter of a fruiterer became a queen, and by her pride nearly lost her position.

307. PALĀSA-JĀTAKA 15

A brahmin pays honour to a tree-spirit and is rewarded by the discovery of a buried treasure.

308. JAVASAKUṆA-JĀTAKA 17

The story of the woodpecker and the ungrateful lion.

p. x

309. CHAVAKA-JĀTAKA 18

How a pariah, who stole mangoes, ventured to reprove a king for allowing a priest to teach him from a lower seat.

310. SAYHA-JĀTAKA 20

How a brahmin refused to give up the ascetic life in order to become family priest to a king.

311. PUCIMANDA-JĀTAKA 22

How a nimb-tree spirit frightened away a robber whose presence endangered the safety of the tree.

312. KASSAPAMANDIYA-JĀTAKA 24

A father and son in journeying together fall out by the way, and the old man is reproved for his want of self-restraint.

313. KHANTIVĀDI-JĀTAKA 26

How a wicked king cruelly maltreated an ascetic, and how the patience of the holy man endured to the end, and the king was cast into Hell.

314. LOHAKUMBHI-JĀTAKA 29

A king is terrified by hearing awful cries in the night and is urged by his family priest to avert the evil omen by the sacrifice of living creatures. A young brahmin interprets the sounds to be the cries uttered by lost souls in Hell, and the king takes comfort and forbids the sacrifice.

315. MAṀMMSA-JĀTAKA32

How four young merchants tried to wheedle a hunter out of his venison, and how one alone by his cunning address succeeded.

316. SASA-JĀTAKA 34

How a hare, in default of other food, offered its own flesh to be eaten, and was rewarded by having its form supernaturally impressed on the face of the moon.

317. MATARODANA-JĀTAKA 38

How a youth, when his brother died, demonstrated the folly of grieving for the dead.

318. KANAVERA-JĀTAKA 39

How a courtezan rescued a robber by betraying her lover to death, and how she was afterwards punished for her treachery.

319. TITTIRA-JĀTAKA 43

A decoy-partridge is troubled with scruples of conscience.

p. xi

320. SUCCAJA-JĀTAKA 44

How a prince requited his wife’s devotion with base ingratitude, until he was brought to a better mind by the admonition of his minister.

321 KUṬIDŪSAKA-JĀTAKA 47

How a monkey, through envy, destroyed a bird’s nest.

322. DADDABHA-JĀTAKA 49

Of the timid hare and the flight of the beasts.

323. BRAHMADATTA-JĀTAKA 52

Of the ascetic who for twelve years had not the courage to ask for a trifling boon.

324. CAMMASĀṬAKA-JĀTAKA 55

Of a foolish mendicant who met his death by mistaking the butting of a ram for a respectful salutation.

325. GODHA-JĀTAKA 56

How a greedy ascetic was outwitted by a lizard.

326. KAKKĀRU-JĀTAKA 58

How a wicked priest was punished for assuming virtues to which he had no claim.

327. KĀKĀTI-JĀTAKA 60

How a roc carried off a king’s wife to his island home, and was afterwards outwitted by the king’s minstrel.

328. ANANUSOCIYA-JĀTAKA 62

The story of the holy man who found a wife by means of a golden image, and how on her death he neither fasted nor wept.

329. KĀLABĀHU-JĀTAKA 65

The story of the parrots and the black monkey, and how the monkey fell into disgrace and the parrots regained the king’s favour.

330. SĪLAVĪMAṀSA-JĀTAKA 66

Of the man who tested the power of virtue and of the moral lessons he learned from the hawk and the piece of meat and from the slave-girl to whom loss of hope alone brought peace.

331. KOKĀLIKA-JĀTAKA 68

How a talkative king was admonished by the fate of the young bird that cried “cuckoo” too soon.

332. RATHALAṬṬHI-JĀTAKA 69

Of the priest and the carters and the danger of giving judgment before hearing both sides.

p. xii

333. GODHA-JĀTAKA 71

How a roasted lizard ran away and how a king was convicted of ingratitude to his wife.

334. RĀJOVĀDA-JĀTAKA 73

A king is taught by the parable of the sweet and bitter fig how his realm is affected by a just or unjust rule.

335. JAMBUKA-JĀTAKA 74

Of the fate of the jackal that presumed to play the part of the lion.

336. BRAHĀCHATTA-JĀTAKA 76

How a prince by means of a spell discovered buried treasure and substituted grass for gold.

337. PĪṬHA-JĀTAKA 78

The duty of hospitality inculcated by the story of the merchant and the ascetic.

338. THUSA-JĀTAKA 80

How a king was saved from being killed by his son, through the repetition of a spell at critical moments.

339. BĀVERU-JĀTAKA 83

How a crow was ousted from a position of favour when a peacock appeared.

340. VISAYHA-JĀTAKA 85

How a rich merchant, after he was reduced to beggary, continued to exercise charity.

341. KAṆḌARI-JĀTAKA 87

(See Kunūla-Jātaka, No. 523.)

342. VĀNARA-JĀTAKA 87

The crocodile outwitted by the monkey.

343. KUNTANI-JĀTAKA 89

The heron’s revenge for the loss of her young ones.

344 AMBACORA-JĀTAKA 90

How a false ascetic robbed a mango orchard and charged some innocent maidens with the theft.

345. GAJAKUMBHA-JĀTAKA 92

Of a slothful king admonished by the example of a lazy tortoise.

p. xiii

346. KESAVA-JĀTAKA 93

The sick hermit and his friend, or love the best physician.

347. AYAKŪṬA-JĀTAKA 96

How a king who had forbidden the sacrifice of living creatures was shielded by a god from the vengeance of a goblin.

348. ARAÑÑA-JĀTAKA 98

Of a virtuous youth led astray by evil communications.

349. SANDHIBHEDA-JĀTAKA 99

A jackal by slanderous words brings about a fatal quarrel between a lion and a bull.

350. DEVATĀPAÑHA-JĀTAKA 101

(See Ummagga-Jātaka.)

351. MAṆIKUṆḌALA-JĀTAKA 102

(Same as No. 303.)

352. SUJĀTA-JĀTAKA 103

A father is cured of inordinate grief by the feigned madness of his son.

353. DHONASĀKHA-JĀTAKA 105

How a king, who was guilty of gross cruelty, met with fitting retribution.

354. URAGA-JĀTAKA 107

How, when a brahmin lost his son, neither he nor any of his family lamented or wept, and of their exceeding great reward.

355. GRATA-JĀTAKA 111

(Same as No. 303.)

356. KĀRAṆḌIYA-JĀTAKA 113

A teacher is taught by his pupil the folly of preaching to unwilling hearers.

357. LAṬUKIKA-JĀTAKA 115

How a quail brought about the destruction of an elephant that had killed her young ones.

358. CULLADHAMMAPĀLA-JĀTAKA 117

A king, being jealous of his queen’s affection for her child, has the boy mutilated and killed, and is punished by being cast into Hell.

p. xiv

359. SUVAṆṆAMIGA-JĀTAKA 120

How a stag caught in a snare was released from death by the devotion of his doe.

360. SUSSONDI-JĀTAKA 123

(Same as No. 327.)

361. VAṆṆĀROHA-JĀTAKA 126

The jackal as calumniator tries in vain to set a lion and a tiger at variance.

362. SĪLAVĪMAṀSA-JĀTAKA 128

How a man tried his own reputation for virtue.

363. HIRI-JĀTAKA 129

(Imperfect. Same as Akataññu-Jātaka, No. 90.)

364. KHAJJOPANAKA-JĀTAKA 130

(See Mahāummagga. )

365. AHIGUṆḌIKA-JĀTAKA 130

How a monkey that had been beaten was not to be cajoled by soft words.

366. GUMBIYA-JĀTAKA 132

How a merchant warned the members of his caravan against eating strange food, and how those that neglected his warning were poisoned by an evil spirit.

367. SĀLIYA-JĀTAKA 133

The biter bit, or the story of the knavish doctor who was killed by the snake which he pretended was harmless.

368. TACASĀRA-JĀTAKA 134

The same story as the preceding one, to which is added how certain lads were acquitted of the charge of having caused the death of the doctor.

369. MITTAVINDA-JĀTAKA 136

(A fragment of No. 41.)

370. PALĀSA-JĀTAKA 137

How a Judas tree was destroyed by the parasitic growth of a banyan shoot.

371. DĪGHITIKOSALA-JĀTAKA 139

A prince spares the life of the king who had slain his father and thereby wins him to repentance.

p. xv

372. MIGAPOTAKA-JĀTAKA 140

An ascetic is admonished against excessive grief for the loss of a pet deer.

373. MŪSIKA-JĀTAKA 142

A king by repeating a spell at critical moments baffles the attempts of his heir to kill him.

374. CULLADHANUGGAHA-JĀTAKA 144

A woman who betrayed her husband to death, and was afterwards deserted by her lover, has her folly brought home to her by witnessing the fate of a greedy jackal.

375. KAPOTA-JĀTAKA 148

How a greedy crow was made ridiculous and tortured to death.

376. AVĀRIYA-JĀTAKA 151

How a foolish ferryman behaved when offered good advice instead of his fare.

377. SETAKETU-JĀTAKA 153

How caste and feigned sanctity were foiled.

378. DARĪMUKHA-JĀTAKA 156

How a king renounced his kingdom on the advice of an old friend, who had become a paccekabuddha.

379. NERU-JĀTAKA 159

How royal birds avoid a golden mountain which makes all birds appear alike.

380. ĀSAṆKA-JĀTAKA 161

How a king spent three years in finding out the name of his future queen.

381. MIGĀLOPA-JĀTAKA 164

How a disobedient vulture perished.

382. SIRIKĀLAKAṆṆI-JĀTAKA 165

How precedence was settled by a good merchant between the goddesses of Good and Ill Fortune.

383. KUKKUṬA-JĀTAKA 168

How a cat failed to deceive a cock.

384. DHAMMADDHAJA-JĀTAKA 170

How a hypocritical crow was put to death.

p. xvi

385. NANDIYAMIGA-JĀTAKA 171

How a good deer brought blessings to his kindred and to all animals.

386. KHARAPUTTA-JĀTAKA 174

How a king got a charm from a nāga by which he understood the sounds of all animals: his queen tried to get the charm from him, but was foiled through some advice given by Sakka, disguised as a goat.

387. SŪCI-JĀTAKA 178

How a young smith made a marvellous needle, and thereby won to wife the daughter of a head-smith.

388. TUṆḌILA-JĀTAKA 180

How a pig explained to his younger brother that death is not to be feared.

389. SUVAṆṆAKAKKAṬA-JĀTAKA 183

How a farmer was saved by a good crab from being killed by a snake in league with a crow: the two latter were themselves killed.

390. MAYHAKA-JĀTAKA 186

How a greedy, murdering uncle was compared to a certain bird, and so converted.

391. DHAJAVIHEṬHA-JĀTAKA 189

How a wicked person, disguised as a Brother, caused the expulsion of Brethren from a kingdom, and the spiritual ruin of the people: Sakka interfered and saved the kingdom.

392. BHISAPUPPHA-JĀTAKA 191

How a brahmin was accused of stealing the smell of a flower.

393. VIGHĀSA-JĀTAKA 193

How certain self-indulgent monks were warned by a parrot.

394. VAṬṬAKA-JĀTAKA 194

How a quail explained to a crow how to get fat.

395. KĀKA-JĀTAKA 195

How a greedy crow was made ridiculous and put to death.

396. KUKKU-JĀTAKA 197

How a king was converted by certain parables.

397. MANOJA-JĀTAKA 199

How a lion was enticed to his death by the counsel of a jackal.

p. xvii

398. SUTANO-JĀTAKA 201

How a king, falling into the power of a man-eating goblin, sent people daily to be eaten: a young man got the better of the goblin and converted him.

399. GIJJHA-JĀTAKA 204

How a good young vulture was loosed from a snare by a hunter.

400. DABBHAPUPPHA-JĀTAKA 205

How two otters, who had caught a fish, were cheated by a jackal.

40I. DASAṆṆAKA-JĀTAKA 207

How a king was cured of a sickness, born of longing for his wife, by seeing a man swallowing a sword.

402. SATTUBHASTA-JĀTAKA 210

How an old brahmin was sent away by his wife to beg: a snake got into his meal-bag unperceived: a young brahmin preacher guessed that the snake was there, and then exposed the wife’s wickedness.

403. AṬṬHISENA-JĀTAKA 216

How a brahmin explains to a king why he makes no petition.

404. KAPI-JĀTAKA 218

How a naughty monkey brought ruin on his kindred.

405. BAKABRAḤMA-JĀTAKA 219

How an angel was converted from heresy.

406. GANDHĀRA-JĀTAKA 221

How two kings became ascetics, and one was admonished in a fault by the other.

407. MAHĀKAPI-JĀTAKA 225

How a monkey saved his followers at the cost of his own life.

408. KUMBHAKĀRA-JĀTAKA 228

How four kings became ascetics through observing a mango-tree, a bracelet, a flock of birds, and same bulls respectively: a potter and his wife separately follow their example.

409. DAḶHADHAMMA-JĀTAKA 233

How a she-elephant, forgotten by the king in her old age, was restored to honour.

410. SOMADATTA-JĀTAKA 235

How an ascetic was comforted for the loss of a young elephant.

p. xviii

411. SUSĪMA-JĀKATA 237

How a king became an ascetic on being shewn a grey hair by his chief queen.

412. KOṬISIMBALI-JĀTAKA 239

How a tree-spirit was frightened by a bird and comforted by a roc-king.

413. DHŪMAKĀRI-JĀTAKA 241

How a king neglected old friends for new ones: his case illustrated by a story of a brahmin goatherd and some deer.

414. JĀGARA-JĀTAKA 243

How an ascetic kept vigil at nights.

415. KUMMĀSAPIṆḌA-JĀTAKA 244

How a king and queen declared the merits in former births that brought about their birth in royal rank.

416. PARANTAPA-JĀTAKA 240

How a prince understood the speech of jackals: and how a king’s son discovered and avenged his father’s murder after many years.

417. KACCĀNI-JĀTAKA 253

How an old woman, expelled from her son’s house owing to her daughter-in-law, thought that Right was dead: and how the whole family became reconciled.

418. AṬṬHASADDA-JĀTAKA 256

How eight sounds that had frightened a king were explained to him harmlessly.

419. SULASĀ-JĀTAKA 260

How a man who would have killed his wife was killed by her.

420. SUMAṄGALA-JĀTAKA 263

How a king would not decide a case till his anger was over.

421. GAṄGAMĀLA-JĀTAKA 266

How a willing servant was reborn as a king: how he shared his kingdom for a time with a poor water-carrier who had shown himself an honest fellow: how a barber got from the king the explanation of his birth in the kingly rank, and became a paccekabuddha, honoured by the king.

422. CETIYA-JĀTAKA 271

How a king, who told a lie in the golden age, sank into the earth and so down to Hell.

p. xix

423. INDRIYA-JĀTAKA 276

How a tempted ascetic was warned by the story of a miserable hunter.

424. ĀDITTA-JĀTAKA 280

How seven paccekabuddhas came and received gifts from a king.

425. AṬṬHĀNA-JĀTAKA 282

How an ascetic repulsed a woman who had once behaved harshly to him.

426. DĪPI-JĀTAKA 285

How a panther ate a she-goat for all her politeness.

427. GIJJHA-JĀTAKA 287

How a vulture perished, through attempting too bold a flight.

428. KOSAMBĪ-JĀTAKA 289

(Imperfect—with a reference to the story in No. 371.)

429. MAHĀSUKA-JĀTAKA 291

How a grateful parrot refused to leave a barren fig-tree.

430. CULLASUKA-JĀTAKA 294

The same story as the preceding one.

431. HĀRITA-JĀTAKA 295

Of an ascetic who would not tell a lie to conceal his sin.

432. PADAKUSALAMĀṆAVA-JATAKA 298

A boy receives, as a gift from a goblin mother, the power of recognizing footsteps even in the air, and a king, to test the boy’s skill, steals his own jewels and then sets the boy to catch the thief. When the boy by a number of pointed stories convicts him of theft, the king is put to death by his own subjects and the boy becomes king.

433. LOMASAKASSAPA-JĀTAKA 306

How a king promised his daughter in marriage to an ascetic, if he would offer a living sacrifice, and how the ascetic resisted the temptation.

434. CAKKAVĀKA-JĀTAKA 309

How a crow, through his greediness, could not attain to the beauty of the ruddy goose.

435. HALIDDIRĀGA-JĀTAKA 311

A youth, who was being led astray by female seductions, is rescued by the sage counsels of his father.

p. xx

436. SAMUGGA-JĀTAKA 313

How a demon, who swallowed his wife and carried her about in his belly, even so failed to keep her virtuous.

437. PŪTIMAṀSA-JĀTAKA 316

How a wise she-goat outwitted the jackal that was plotting to kill her.

438. TITTIRA-JĀTAKA 319

How a wicked ascetic killed a learned partridge, and how a lion and a tiger avenged the death of the partridge.

Quý vị có thể để lại nhận xét, ý kiến hoặc lời nhắn tại ô này. Thanh Tịnh Lưu Ly xin thành kính tri ân và ghi nhận mọi đóng góp ý kiến từ quý vị

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